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ANZAC Day in Gallipoli – A Dedication

A few thoughts and words from our few days attending ANZAC Day in Gallipoli where we commemorated the ANZAC Soldiers killed in World War I.

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ANZAC Day Chunuk Bair Memorial

97 years ago on the 25th April 1915 tens of thousands of men and boys, most younger than me,stood on the shores of Gallipoli Peninsula. Britain had asked for something that could never be given back. Britain asked for what are now known as; The ANZACs.

ANZAC Cove Gallipoli

ANZAC Day in Gallipoli – ANZAC Cove

These ANZACs, or more specifically the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, were lured to the shores of Turkey during World War I by the sense of adventure, travel and the glory of war. What the ANZACs didn’t know 97 years ago was that more than 10,000 of them would never see their families again. All in the name of protecting our nations.

For that, we are eternally grateful.

ANZAC Day in Gallipoli

We can only begin to imagine what must have run through the minds of those soldiers as the dawn broke across such a magnificent landscape. Was this the adventure that they sought months ago in New Zealand.

ANZAC Cove sunset

ANZAC Day in Gallipoli – ANZAC Cove sunset

At the beginning, probably. By the end of the first day, I think not.

Sitting in the cold at ANZAC Cove overnight on the 24th April we feel lucky to have our sleeping bags to keep us warm. While all they had was courage and the beginning of what would become the birth of a nations identity.

ANZAC day in Gallipoli is a pilgrimage for Kiwi’s and Australian’s. Every year thousands of young, and old, travel thousands of kilometers to the same shores that many of our grandfathers and great-grandfathers stood all those years ago. There is a strong need for us to see where our heritage comes from.

The 9 months in the trenches of ANZAC Cove also created strong bonds that have become known as “mateship“. It is a bond between those men in the trenches that was born from the need to form a lifeline to your home and family through your friends. Living and dying in such hellish conditions halfway around the world will quickly create that unbreakable bond.

And I believe that is why so many survivors refuse to speak of what happened during World War I.

Shrapnel Valley ANZAC Cove

ANZAC Day in Gallipoli – Shrapnel Valley

ANZAC Day in Gallipoli Dawn Service

As the dawn breaks, the darkness that grips ANZAC Cove is broken while the silence is broken by a high pitch Waiata (traditional Maori word for song) welcoming us to the ceremony and commemorating those that were lost. Just as it was on the 25th April 1915 the beautiful shoreline of the Aegan Sea and rugged steep Turkish cliffs at our backs are revealed in the morning light.

Beauty surrounds us everywhere on Gallipoli Peninsula and we cannot comprehend how such a place of stunning wilderness could have seen so much bloodshed. The ground beneath our feet must have run red with the blood spilled from so many ANZAC and Turkish soldiers.

Our sleep filled eyes are quickly forgotten as you suddenly remember what we have come to Gallopoli for. We have come to honour those who fell on distant shores. And honour we do.

Once the dawn service has finished in ANZAC Cove it is a tough3.1 km slog uphill to the Lone Pine, site of the Australian service. And then another 3.2 km further up to Chunuk Bair, the site of the New Zealand service. Huffing and puffing in the early morning light under the scorching sun we have to keep reminding ourselves that this is nothing compared to what our soldiers went through.

Chunuk Bair ANZAC Cove Gallopoli, ANZAC Day in Gallipoli

ANZAC Day in Gallipoli – New Zealand Memorial at Chunuk Bair

I don’t know how you could but try to imagine that uphill slog with an 80 pound backpack. Oh yea, don’t forget that your friends are falling in the hundreds around you and bullets continue to fly around your head. Any second could be your last. Like I said, pretty hard to imagine.

Reaching the individual and personalised ceremonies is a really special feeling. Being surrounded halfway around the world by thousands of your fellow countrymen is a very moving experience. In fact, there is probably nowhere else in the entire world where New Zealander’s and Australian’s have such strong ties to a country.

A final thought.

Attending the celebrations, and I use the word celebration for all it is worth as it is a celebration of countries coming together, was a very moving and once in a lifetime experience for us. Being able to share it with our fellow Kiwi’s and Australian’s will forever hold a special place in my heart.

The most amazing feeling that I took away from the entire experience was that we were not even in our own countries. Here we were standing on the Turkish shoreline remembering a war in which so many of our own soldiers killed Turkish soldiers. But we are continuously welcomed. After so much horror for both sides we are still all able to come together out of a mutual and strong respect for one another.

For that we are thankful.

Lest we forget.

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26 Comments

26 Comments

  1. bronwen burmester

    April 28, 2012 at 4:09 AM

    Got shivers all over my body reading your Gallipoli account Cole, thanks.

    • Cole Burmester

      April 28, 2012 at 6:57 AM

      It was really nice and extremely moving Mum 🙂 Wish you guys could have been there with us too!

  2. Pete

    April 28, 2012 at 7:27 AM

    I had an interesting conversation with one of our good friends we have made here. Not knowing much about ANZAC day prior to our trip here, I was intrigued that so many people from Australia and New Zealand came here to honor and I questioned him if there had ever been a problem with accepting that they come to your soil to do so. Your last statement is what he could not piece together in English, it sums it up perfectly that it is a mutual and strong respect for one another.

    I am glad that you had the chance to attend, and it must have been emotional and powerful. I imagine it would be to the same effect as myself attending the ceremony in Normandy. Cheers guys, and enjoy some sun and water on the cruise.

    • Cole Burmester

      April 28, 2012 at 1:42 PM

      We have spoken to a lot of Turkish people as well and they are all the same. They love that we come here for ANZAC Day and actually realised that they need to do the same sort of thing so have created their own special monuments as well. There is so much history and passion around Gallipoli so both sides have done a great job of accommodating such a special moment.

  3. Laurence

    April 28, 2012 at 9:46 AM

    Visiting places like this always staggers me. The horrors that people endured, and for so long. I am always so grateful for the sacrifices made, but saddened that they were necessary.. and that somehow.. war still exists 🙁

    • Cole Burmester

      April 28, 2012 at 1:39 PM

      It amazes us that there is still wars as well. How can people be so stupid that we are still attacking one another!

  4. Laura @Travelocafe

    April 28, 2012 at 8:01 PM

    🙂 Learned something new. Great information about the ANZAC.

    • Cole Burmester

      May 7, 2012 at 9:30 AM

      Glad we could teach you something Laura 🙂 The more people that remember/commemorate these sorts of events and days then the better in our opinion!

  5. Ian [EagerExistence]

    April 30, 2012 at 5:38 AM

    Last year when I went, Chunuk Bair was the biggest memorial of them all, in terms of numbers. I guess its a small area anyway… but there was a mad scramble to get in and listen to the proceedings. How was it this year? How was the atmosphere at the Cove on the 24th? Electric eh? Especially as the sun comes up. Once-in-a-lifetime. Agreed.

    • Cole Burmester

      May 6, 2012 at 3:56 PM

      ANZAC Cove was brilliant during the build up. They had all the music and doco’s playing all night and then as the sun came up it became eerily quiet. Will remember it forever!

  6. Natalie

    May 1, 2012 at 5:04 AM

    Have you read the speech by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk regarding the event Cole?

    “Those heroes who shed their blood and lost their lives … you are now lying in the soil of a friendly country. Therefore rest in peace. There is no difference between the Johnnies and the Mehmets to us where they lie side by side here in this country of ours… You, the mothers who sent their sons from far away countries, wipe away your tears. Your sons are now lying in our bosom and are in peace. After having lost their lives on this land, they have become our sons as well.”

    • Cole Burmester

      May 6, 2012 at 3:59 PM

      They read it out during the commemorations and it really moved the entire crowd. Made us all realise just how special ANZAC Cove and Gallipoli is to the Turks as well. Thanks Natalie 🙂

  7. Ayngelina

    May 1, 2012 at 9:56 AM

    I hadn’t heard of this day until this year. We have something here in Canada like that although it’s very solemn, I get the impression in Australia it’s a big party?

    • Cole Burmester

      May 6, 2012 at 4:01 PM

      It is not so much a party as a celebration of our nations history but still very solemn and extremely moving for us. In the past there has been quite a bit of controversy at ANZAC Cove with drunk Aussies and Kiwi’s which is SO disrespectful. Luckily that has all changed and it is so much better for it now.

  8. Nina F

    May 3, 2012 at 3:47 AM

    Sadly, I don’t think the human race will ever be free of war. In the name of freedom and religion, we are still fighting ourselves.

    I had no idea about the meaning of Gallipoli and ANZAC. Thanks for sharing.

    • Cole Burmester

      May 6, 2012 at 4:03 PM

      No worries Nina. I am glad that we managed to teach you something about ANZAC Day 🙂

      Unfortunately I agree with you that I don’t think we will be free of war. How can we all be so selfish?!

  9. Ali

    May 5, 2012 at 12:21 AM

    Great photos. I can’t imagine what it must’ve been like for those soldiers, but I think it is so important to continue remembering what they went through for their countries. The horrible events of the past, no matter what form, are vital for improving the future.

    • Cole Burmester

      May 7, 2012 at 9:32 AM

      You definitely summed it up Ali! If we continue to remember then we will hopefully all learn from it 🙂

  10. Courtney Mroch

    May 7, 2012 at 9:57 PM

    I’m really bummed we didn’t make the trek to Gallipoli when we were in Istanbul. It seemed like a very remarkable place, and it’s even more remarkable what all happened there. Thank you for sharing this so I semi-sort of got to experience it … at least virtually.

    • Cole Burmester

      May 10, 2012 at 10:07 AM

      No problem Courtney 🙂 Hopefully you can return sometime soon!

  11. Turtle

    May 28, 2012 at 8:50 PM

    Beautiful story. A lot of people I meet don’t understand why we Aussies and Kiwis commemorate such a great loss. But that’s the whole point, isn’t it? It’s not the outcome but the bravery, mateship and patriotism that’s so important.

    • Cole Burmester

      May 29, 2012 at 9:54 AM

      Thanks Michael. I actually don’t like calling it commemorating because I think it should be a celebration. I know it’s not right to celebrate so many dead but to me that’s what ANZAC Day stands for now.

  12. Mary @ Green Global Travel

    June 13, 2012 at 8:41 PM

    Thanks for sharing this moving experience. Here in the USA, I hadn’t heard of ANZAC Day. It reminds me of the terrible cost of war to all involved.

    • Cole Burmester

      June 18, 2012 at 8:11 AM

      It is a really special day for all Kiwi’s and Aussies Mary so glad you know about it now :). It is ridiculous that in this day and age we are still fighting wars. I just don’t understand it.

  13. Tash

    April 25, 2013 at 5:17 AM

    I went in 2005 – an experience that stays with you forever, and brought back again and again every year. Such an important trip for all Kiwis and Aussies.
    Your post takes me back again, today – Lest We Forget

    • Cole Burmester

      April 25, 2013 at 7:27 PM

      Great to hear how it made you feel Tash 🙂 Glad I could bring some memories back for you!

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Europe

Making the Most of a Trip to Monaco

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Monaco is one of the hottest destinations in travel right now, and there has never been a better time to explore the principality that attracts over 320,000 visitors a year from all around the world. While Princess Grace Kelly of Monaco helped plant Monaco firmly on the movie-goers map, and the winding roads and glorious hill-scapes send our minds back to James Bond-esque car rides, there is another side to Monaco that gives itself as the perfect stopover for the adventure holiday-maker.

Monaco in Brief

Nestled on the French coast on the Mediterranean Riviera, Monaco is the richest nation in the world – not just for the celebrity yachts and sports cars that glint in the Monegasque sun – as according to The World Bank, the people of Monaco earn more per capita than any other nation, which is evidenced in how luxurious a place it is. But, it doesn’t just have to be a destination for those with laden pockets. With a population of around 30,000, Monaco was founded as a colony of Genoa in 1215. The House of Grimaldi presided over Monaco ever since (with a brief period of French rule from 1789 to 1814) – with the Prince of Monaco acting as supreme ruler. That is until 1911, when Monaco became a constitutional government, with the monarchy acting as a figurehead, much like Great Britain’s. But what can be done in Monaco?

SOURCE: Pixabay

Formula One

Monaco, of course, is well known for the Monaco Grand Prix, a Formula 1 race held annually on the Circuit de Monaco. Begun in 1929, and forming 1/3 of the Triple Crown of Motorsport, the race is considered one of the most prestigious in the world. The streets of Monaco are transformed into the circuit, which makes it naturally one of the most dangerous and difficult to manoeuvre through in the world. The track changes, corners, and elevations combine with the luxurious atmosphere to make the winner of the tournament extremely lauded over. While participants clearly can’t rock up to join the race, finding your wheels on the same streets is a sure adrenaline burst, especially for sports fans.

SOURCE: Pixabay

Nightlife

Thanks in part to Casino Royale, Monaco is on the map for the extensive connection it has to casinos, and more specifically the iconic Casino Monte Carlo, that the nightlife of the city-state revolves around. In the beginning of roulette, the wheel had been modified in order to ensure the player’s odds were high enough to have a chance of winning with the single zero machine, Monaco accepted the game developed by Louis Blanc of Germany. Until 1933, roulette was played exclusively in Monaco, and the game helped place Monaco on the map for being a high stakes, exuberant place. As such, the roulette wheel was at the centre of the night out, that spilled into nearby bars and clubs. Monaco continues this tradition of bustling bars and celebrity-spotting clubs, replete with live music, cabaret events, and special guests, with the Living Room and La Racasse providing as glamorous an evening as James Bond would indulge in.

SOURCE: Pixabay

Water-sports

Located on the Avenue de Princess Grace, Lavrotto Beach is home to not only beautifully clear water and scorching sand, but a variety of water-sports for the nautical adventurer. From canoeing and kayaking under The Rock, to snorkelling and scuba diving to discover the shoals that live beneath the deluxe city-state and rival those of the Great Barrier Reef. For those who are into faster experiences, jet skis are available to cruise the blue lagoon, and flyboarding can be done in the bay. Motorised water-sports are extremely popular and an easy way to get that heart rate going.

Seeing Monaco from the Sky

France is extremely popular for its hot air balloon rides, and Monaco has adopted this pastime as well. The perfect way to take all 202 hectares in is to soar above it propelling by a canister of liquid propane gas. The hot air balloon ride can be as exciting or as leisurely as you make it, and can form the basis of a picnic high in the sky. Alternatively, you can don your swimsuit and hop onto a parachute behind a speedboat, to see Monaco from above while parasailing. Both methods allow you to feel the wind in your hair and witness the beauty of Monaco.

Monaco is a magnificent place; and a definite spot for anyone wanting an exciting break – just a short trip down from France, and a perfect stop for any time from a day to a week. While the excitement may differ from bouldering and white water rafting, the thrill in the air of being amongst the yachts, the beautiful scenery, and the scent of celebrity is enough to get hearts racing.

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Europe

5 Unmissable Northern Ireland Attractions

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Northern Ireland is a beautiful part of the world, yet one which often lies off the usual tourist track. However, there are many great places to visit and things to see and do in this region – offering the perfect getaway from packed tourist destinations and a chance to see a largely unspoiled natural landscape.

Despite this, there are still many different attractions within the area that are well worth a visit. From city scenes to geological wonders, the sheer versatility means that there is guaranteed to be something for everyone in the region.

If you are thinking of paying Northern Ireland a visit, here are five of the best attractions that the area has to offer – just waiting for you to arrive!

Giant’s Causeway

Instantly recognisable and famed across the world, the Giant’s Causeway is a definite must-see. Northern Ireland’s only UNESCO world heritage site, the Causeway is a unique example of natural beauty and wonder. Take time out of your schedule to explore, clambering over the rocks and discovering the science, myths and legends behind this ancient monument. A Giant’s Causeway tour also makes the ideal way to learn about the Causeway and get to know the area, as you are shown around by a knowledgeable tour guide.

Belfast

Northern Ireland’s capital, Belfast is a city steeped in years of history. Boasting plenty of varied attractions, there is guaranteed to be something to suit every taste in Belfast. Spend some time wandering the streets and exploring the city’s shops and eateries, or instead, head out and visit one of the dedicated tourist attractions. As the birthplace of the ill-fated Titanic, history buffs are sure to enjoy a visit to Titanic Belfast, the museum which commemorates the ship and the tragedy that followed her maiden launch. Alternatively, a visit to Crumlin Road Gaol is another favourite on Belfast’s tourist trail. Explore the gaol and learn all about its rich history, right through to its eventual closure as a working prison in 1996.

Murlough National Nature Reserve

For those who prefer a taste of the great outdoors, head out to the stunning landscape of Murlough National Nature Reserve and spend some time getting back to grips with nature. Ideal for a fun-filled family day out or a relaxing day spent exploring, the reserve offers the perfect example of an unspoiled wilderness situated in the picturesque Irish countryside. There are plenty of walking routes and trails dotted across the reserve, so pick your favourite and head off to explore more of the beautiful scenery!

Dunluce Castle

Brooding and full of a unique atmosphere, Dunluce Castle is a perfect example of cultural history and architecture. Located on the coast, this impressive ruin offers stunning views across the water and is also an understandable favourite among budding photographers. A must-see landmark along the Antrim coast, the castle offers a real mix of Irish history and different time periods.

Derry

Perfectly combining tradition and history with a quirky, contemporary twist, Derry is Northern Ireland’s second-largest city – a city with something to suit everyone. From its vast array of quaint cafes and eateries to the traditional architecture, history buffs are sure to want to pay Derry a visit. If you do decide to head down to Derry, make sure not to miss the historic city walls. Striking and memorable yet also enlightening, a walk around the walls is sure to help you step back in time and discover Derry’s past and rich history.

Are you feeling inspired? These are just a few of the many exciting places to visit on offer within the region. Northern Ireland truly is a hidden gem – why not discover the beauty of this area for yourself on your next trip?

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Europe

Worlds’ Best Surfing Breaks: Lanzarote’s El Quemao

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Lanzarote plays host to some serious, world-class level surfing. The volcanic island rises straight up through the water, and because it lacks a continental shelf the waves it gets from the Atlantic are completely unobstructed. With low precipitation, balmy winds and endless sunshine, this laid-back island is every surfer dude’s dream.

In the northwest, El Quemao is a commanding left and right-hand reef break. You can experience colossal swells of up to five metres high, rivalling those in Hawaii. This area is meant for the expert. The waves continuously form quick tubes with vertical descents, perfect to enter, descend and ride the tube.

Restaurants in Fethiye

Seven of the Best Restaurants on Lanzarote

Table Arrcife Known for their burgers, tapas and their large selection of beer.

Casa de la Playa, Arrieta Go for authentic Canarian seafood cuisine overlooking the beach.

El Mirador, Playa Blanca Enjoy seafood by the ocean!

Cofradia de Pescadores, Playa Blanca Specialising in seafood; ask for the fresh fish of the day.

Restaurante del Diablo, Timanfaya This lunch-only restaurant utilises volcanic heat to cook their various meat dishes.

El Tenique, Tiagua They offer delicious meat fare. Their popular Cabra is served on Sundays.

El Chupadero, La Geria Situated in wine country, enjoy a glass of vino, tapas and live music.

Hippy Holidays – Low Impact Lanzarote

Pack a lunch and explore former Hippy Heaven, Papagayo, by bike. There is a family-friendly beach with calmer waters to paddle in and swim. There are also out-of-the-way places for older children to explore.

Visit Timanfaya National Park. It is 50 km² of expansive plains, volcanic ash, fossilised lava, geysers and boulders. Amp up the exotic by joining a Camel Train to explore this region.

Consider getting around by bicycle to get exploring areas off the beaten path, as well as beaches, finding smaller towns and farmers’ markets.

Fancy a Holiday in Malta? Now You Can Fly from Southend

As of October 29, 2017, EasyJet is scheduled to fly twice weekly from London Southend Airport to Malta year-round. London Southend has its own train station that runs up to six trains per hour to and from central London. This will carry passengers from Essex to the South End.

Malta, south of Sicily, has grown in popularity. The weather is great year-round (19 to 30 degrees). It is also the home of three World Heritage Sites.

Inland from Alicante: Seven Out-of-the-Way Places

Alcoy Here you will find Barchell Castle, the convent of St. Augusti and church of Santa Maria. The Moors and Christians festival is a must see.

Le Romana See cave houses; there are some cave properties currently in use.

Aspe Grapes grown in this region are tied to a custom of eating 12 grapes at New Years.

Cocentaina While at the village of La Villa, visit the Comtat Palace.

Ontinyent Archaeological finds around the area date back to the Bronze Age and Iberian period.

Bocairent Cobbled streets and architecture allow you to see what life was like many centuries ago.

Guadalest Go see the castle of San Jose. Access to this fortress is via a natural tunnel through the rocks.

Benidorm by Drone

Viewing Benidorm by a drone shows the magnificence of this area. The ocean is a stunning blue-green; the eye never tires of it. Numerous apartments and hotels hug the beaches of Playa Poniente and Playa Levante. In between these seafronts lies the Canfali vantage point with the majestic Mal Pas cove at its foot. You can also see the energetic lights of theme parks. Benidorm has five of them. The Las Vegas-style Benidorm Palace can also be seen. The beautiful Villaitana golf course looks smaller than its actual two 18-hole golf courses. These landmarks invite you to come and play.

Responsible Travel – Surfing in Lanzarote- https://www.responsiblevacation.com/vacations/lanzarote/travel-guide/surfing-in-lanzarote
Surfing in El Quemao http://www.hellocanaryislands.com/surfing/lanzarote/surfing-el-quemao/
Surfinglife.com (by Rich) http://www.surfinglife.com/surfing-in-lanzarote-canary-islands-3/

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Meet Cole and Adela

Cole and AdelaWe have been wearing out our jandals (Kiwi for flip-flops) on our travel adventures around the world since 2009. We think our blog is thought provoking and a little witty. But we have been proven wrong before. Find out more about us here...

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